Coup d'État

Paris Fashion Week 2020 - Day 6

Panama based Spanish blogger Gisele Del Río travelled to the French capital at the end of February, covering Fashion Week for Coup d’État.

Initially scheduled to be printed in our April issue, we share with you her coverage; an intimate account of her stay in ‘La Ville Lumière.’

Lee este artículo en español

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It is Monday, March 2, there are only two days left and the adventures do not stop. This morning, because the first runway is in the afternoon, we choose to order breakfast at home. We love Tinah's but I crave some delicacies from Season. With this weather and the little time we have to rest and edit, we rather stay quietly in the hotel.

It is time to make our way to Giambattista Valli fashion show, which presents a collection very feminine and made up of classic garments with a touch of daring. A snapshot of Parisian girls’ multiple paradigms: a tribute to Valli’s adoptive city and the women who walk its streets.

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We go out, we are hungry but before eating I want to take photos of my outfit. We are very close to the famous Place du Palais-Royal. Normally it is one of the busiest in Paris, but since it is raining I bet it will be deserted, which we won’t complain about. An hour later, frozen to death and soaking wet (but happy with my photos), we are going to eat something. We have little time, our next appointment is at four.

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Nearby, walking down Rue Saint Honoré, we walk in Wild and the Moon, one of my must-sees. It is a raw-vegan restaurant where almost all the food is ready to take away. We sit. We opt for a pumpkin cream to warm us up and a couple of salads. Then we will come back for dessert (they are delicious and besides they are the kind you could eat daily without regrets).

We are a few meters away from Place Vendôme, where we have an appointment with Valentino to see the details of its latest collection. It contrasts with the garments from the previous season in the first row, which were bright neon and covered with prints. The color and those ornaments that Valentino had accustomed us to practically disappear.

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Behind the scenes, Piccioli said: “What I wanted to do was a portrait of a moment without categories. Fashion has to register and accept great changes in the world. We have to encourage tolerance and equality.” Pierpaolo expressed his opinion on a world without stereotypes by putting men in women's clothing and vice versa. In fact, the coat that opened the men's collection show last month was worn by a female model in this one. A collection that breaks the mold in which we also saw discreet beauties very Valentino.

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